Family: Ranunculaceae
Scientific Name: Anemone blanda 
Common Name: Anemone blanda, Greek Anemones, Grecian Wind Flower
Description:
A low growing plant with daisy-like flowers. Grows from a tuber not a bulb.
Pronunciation:
(a-NEM-o-nee)
plant type:
Bulbs, corms, tubers, rhizoms, etc.
Hardiness zone:
Sunlight:
In zone #5 they can take spring sun, usually plant as an ephemeral under deciduous trees.
Moisture:
average, moist, avoid dry sites
Soil & Site:
average, moist
Growing Media:
Temperature:
cool sites
Flowers:
2" daisy-like, most common color blue but also, pink white and shades in-between
Fruit:
Leaves:
finely divided with three lobes, leaves resemble parsley or ranunculus
Stems:
forms a tuber, look like dried rasions
Roots:
Dimensions:
Maintenance:
When opening a package of A. blanda tubers they will look like dried raisins. I wet the dried tubers over night in moist paper towels or peat moss. Plant about 2-3" deep with four or more per square foot. Will spread by reseeding
Propagation:
seeds, division
Native site:
Native to areas from Greece through Asia minor to the Caucasus.
Cultivar Origin:
Misc Facts:
Anemone from the Greek "anemone" wind and "mone" fo habitation.
Author's Notes:
At a Botanic garden I frequent the planting of the Windflower are tucked in areas under shrubs, by walls, etc. Eye candy in the spring. Especially the waves of blue flowers.
Notes & Reference:
#59-Naturalizing Bulbs (Rob Proctor), #113-Bulbs for Gardens Habits (Judy Glattstein), #146-Early Bulbs (Rod Leeds), #145-Plant Lives (Sue Eland) web site
Photos: