Family: Bromeliaceae

Scientific Name: Aechmea fasciata

Common Name: Aechmea fasciata, Silver Vase Plant, Urn Plant

DescriptionAechmea fasciata is a vase shaped Bromeliad and one of the easier ones to grow.
Pronunciation(eek-MEE-uh)(fass-ee-AY-tuh)
Plant TypeIndoor Foliage, Perennial Tender, Bromeliad
Hardiness Zone10-11
Sunlightbright not direct
Moistureevenly moist to approach dryness, keep the vase full of water
Growing Mediaaverage house, epiphytic mix
Temperatureaverage house, warm, not less than around 58 degrees
FlowersMost of the part we call the flower is really modified leaves called bracts. The flowers are small and purplish that extend out from the colorful bracts. After the main vase flowers, it will eventually die and be replaced by the new suckers from the side.
LeavesThe leaves form a water-collecting vase. In the wild different animals will live in this vase. The chalky blue-gray color comes from the over lapping scales. These easily flake off.
DimensionsA medium sized plant, easily grown in 6"-8" pots.
MaintenanceThe water in the vase should be emptied from time to time it can become stale after a period of time. Remove the dead flower when it starts to detract from the appearance of the plant.
PropagationDivision is the easiest way. Can be grown from seeds
Native SiteFound growing in mountainous rain forests of southern Brazil as an epiphytic plant (plants that grow in trees)
Misc FactsGenus name "Aechmea" derived from the Greek word aichme (point) in reference to the spear-shaped leaves.
Author's NotesI have grown this plant for many years and it is easy to grow. A former student comment to me on how they liked this plant for commercial interior plantings since it was very tolerant of a missed watering. In order to get it to bloom again may be a tricky thing. First it must be in a good growing environment and should a mature plant. If it still fails to bloom try putting it in a plastic bag for a week or so with a piece of ripe fruit. The ripe fruit gives off ethylene gas. This gas stimulates flower formation.
Notes & Reference#18-House Plant Encyclopedia (Nico Vermeulen)